Cross-stitch: My Feminism will be Intersectional…

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…or it will be Bullshit!

With all the credit in the world for coining such a brilliant phrase, and also for improving the intersectionality of my own feminism, to Flavia Dzodan, who I dearly hope is recovering. I finished this cross stitch in the spring, but don’t have a pressed, finished version to show, because it is sitting crumpled in a bag. Though I love the phrase and enjoyed making it (apart from the block grey – note to self: don’t cross stitch block colours!), I seem to keep finding that when I finish making something, I lose the passion for it.

Perhaps this is a sign that I should start making things to sell.

Cross stitch with the phrase "My feminism will be intersectional or it will be bullshit". Most of the text overlays the intersection of a road, with the Bullshit separate below and surrounded by stars

Cross stitch with the phrase “My feminism will be intersectional or it will be bullshit”. Most of the text overlays the intersection of a road, with the “Bullshit” separate below and surrounded by stars

 

 

Olive’s Blanket

My first “real” crochet project (I made a hat and scarf before this but used horrible acrylic wool and will never wear them!).

Made using a series of granny squares and patterns for letters from this website, which sadly seems to have all its images taken down.

The granny squares are all simple double-crochet using patterns from Debbie Stoller’s book Stitch ‘n Bitch Crochet

If I was doing it again I think I’d make the squares one row larger, as sewing the whole thing together took FOREVER!

I didn’t measure the blanket before giving it away, but have a photo with my hand in to give an idea of scale.

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Dinosaur triangle bean bag

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Some time ago, I found a single duvet cover and pillow case set in a charity shop with DINOSAURS on it. Despite not owning (and having no intention of owning) a single duvet, I couldn’t resist this amazing fabric. Since then I’ve been using the pillow cases, and vaguely intending to make a bean bag-type thing (but probably with foam as less noisy and more comfy than beans/pellets). Then yesterday I had the GENIUS idea of combining a need to store our spare duvets with my plans for dinosaur-related comfy seating.

As ever, it turns out I was not the first person to have this idea. Kains on the Creek describes how to make a small one to store a child’s duvet, with fab photos. The problem with this (and all the other posts I found), is they draw on instructions from a now-defunct post. So I’m re-posting here in full so anyone else can have a go too. The most helpful description I found was for these mini pillows, but I got completely stuck staring at picture 3 and trying to reconcile it with what was in front of me.

So here’s my version, for a pretty huge adult “bean bag” that doubles as spare bedding storage:

Start with a single duvet cover, preferably in awesome dinosaur form (bonus points for contrasting front and back patterns):

"Front" side of dino duvet cover with pale green background and landscape of dinosaurs on ground and in the sky

“Front” side of dino duvet cover with pale green background and landscape of dinosaurs on ground and in the sky

Contrasting side of duvet cover with brown background and repeating dino pattern

Contrasting side of duvet cover with brown background and repeating dino pattern

Cut the “top” end (furthest from the opening) to make a square. I started with edges of 140cm but after some trial and error, reduced that to 115cm (plus extra for seams) based on the amount of bedding I had to stuff. My style of crafting is very much about trial and error!

Duvet cut into square

Duvet cut into square

Sew up top edge, so there are now three sealed edges.

The next step will take it from a flat square to a 3D pyramid. The final seam needs to be made perpendicularly to the side hems. The following two photos show the open edge as normal, then after folding to give a perpendicular seam:

Showing the open end

Showing the open end

Open end after turning and re-folding

Open end after turning and re-folding

And the whole thing laid out ready for the final seam:

Duvet after turning and re-folding

Duvet after turning and re-folding

You only want to sew along half of the final edge, to leave space for taking out the bedding. As I started with a duvet, there were already buttons at one end. I removed the buttons and put the seam on that edge (the brown side), and utilised the button holes already on the green side to reattach the buttons.

Begin sewing last side at centre and sew to end

Begin sewing last side at centre and sew to end

Once your buttons (or zip etc.) are attached, stuff with the bedding of your choice! Mine has two double duvets, three pillows and a dressing gown inside. Handy storage!

Beanbag! (Green side)

Beanbag! (Green side)

Beanbag! (brown side)

Beanbag! (brown side)

Beanbag! (contrast between both colours)

Beanbag! (contrast between both colours)

Drum hat

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A drum hat is mostly just a large flat circle, to keep the skin of a drum warm and dry. I had this beautiful wool with a gradually changing colour which I wanted to use. I started by crocheting a very simple spiral, which can be seen at the bottom of this post. But I decided I didn’t like the way some of the colours sat beside each other, and that I wanted a pattern which changed colour radially. I searched all over the internets and couldn’t find anything, so designed my own. The pattern is very dependent on the weight of the wool you are using (since the height of the stitch needed at each distance from the centre is related to the imaginary circumference at that distance, and the stitch needed for that height is determined by the weight of the wool and hook you are using). Details of how I calculated the stitches needed are in the PDF, and if you’re really keen (read: geeky) I will be happy to share the spreadsheet of calculations if you contact me.

Top-down view of crocheted drum hat, with radial pattern of gradually changing colour wool

Top-down view of crocheted drum hat, with radial pattern of gradually changing colour wool

Side-on view of crocheted drum hat, with radial pattern of gradually changing colour wool

Side-on view of crocheted drum hat, with radial pattern of gradually changing colour wool

Drum hat pattern – crocheting radially
Worsted weight wool, 4.5mm hook.
Full pattern (see PDF for more information)
Row 1: ch 29, ss in 6th ch from hook to form circle (23 ch remaining)
Row 2: ch 1, sc in 2nd ch from circle, ch 1, sc in 4th ch from circle, 3 hdc in next 3 ch, 3 dc in 3 ch, 3 htc in 3 ch, 3 tc in 3 ch, 3 hqc in 3 ch, 3 qc in 3 ch, 1 h5c in final ch.
Row 3: ch 4, skip st at base of chain, qc in next st, 2 qc in next 2, 3 hqc in next 3, 3 tc in 3, 3 htc in 3, 3 dc in 3, 3 hdc in 3, ch 1 in 3, sc, ch 1, sc, sc into circle.
Row 4: ch 1, sc in 1st ch from circle, ch 1, sc in 2nd ch from circle, 3 hdc in 3 hdc, 3 dc in 3 dc, 3 htc in 3 htc, 3 tc in 3 tc, 3 hqc in 3 hqc, 3 qc in 3 qc, 1 h5c in h5c.
Rows 5 – 42: Repeat rounds 3 and 4. Sew together or ss along join. (You may need more/less rows to make a flat circle, it’s a judgement call).

Drum hat pattern (PDF)

Spiral drum hat with gradually changing colour wool

Spiral drum hat with gradually changing colour wool

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